Select DistinctRow * From SwRl Where State = '#st#' and Cat='need'

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#statefull#

Select DistinctRow * From SwRl Where State = '#st#' and Cat='summary'
Additional Information:

#HCT#

  1. Do I need a stormwater permit? How do I apply? As of March 10, 2003 in order to discharge stormwater from a construction site, all construction projects that disturb 1 acre or more of land must seek coverage under a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general construction permit. There are two applicable permits (in some cases both activities are covered by one permit):
    • Large construction activities - disturb five or more acres of land.
    • Small construction activities - disturb at least one acre, but less than five acres of land.
    Disturbance includes, but is not limited to soil disturbance, clearing, grading, and excavation. Large construction activities are defined as being five or more acres. Operators of sites disturbing less than one acre are also required to obtain a permit if their activity is part of a “larger common plan of development or sale” with a planned disturbance of one acre or greater.

    The District of Columbia has not received federal authority to issue construction stormwater permits. #getstate.statefull# is one of five states, along with the District of Columbia, that has not received federal authority to issue construction stormwater permits. As a result, the permitting authority is the US EPA. To apply for coverage under a general permit you must file an application with the your regional US EPA Office (see locator under Where can I find additional stormwater compliance resources?) prior to commencement of your construction activities.

    In addition to these rules, you may be required to meet additional local stormwater and erosion control regulations. Check with your city or county government to determine if additional local rules apply to your construction project.

    To apply for coverage under the general permit, you must:

    1. Download a copy of the general permit below to determine if you are eligible for the permit. The text of the permit explains what must be included in your stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) and what you need to do in order to comply with the permit.
    2. Determine if you are eligible to use the permit. You will need to document how you determined your eligibility with regard to protection of endangered species, total maximum daily loads, etc. For example:
      • The operator must ensure and document that discharges are not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any Federally-listed endangered or threatened species or result in the adverse modification or destruction of habitat that is Federally-designated as critical under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
      • Determine whether an EPA approved or established TMDL exists that specifically addresses its discharge and if so, take necessary actions to be consistent with the assumptions and requirements of that approved TMDL. To make this determination, the operator will need to (1) determine the waterbody into which it discharges, (2) identify if there is an approved TMDL for that waterbody, (3) determine if that TMDL includes specific requirements (e.g., wasteload allocation or load allocation) applicable to its construction site, and (4) if so incorporate those requirements into the SWPPP and implement necessary steps to comply with them.
    3. Prepare your stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) of your eligibility in your SWPPP.
    4. Fill out an NOI form and submit it to EPA at least seven days before you start construction. You can do this electronically (click here for Electronic Notice of Intent, eNOI).
  2. Do I need a stormwater permit? How do I apply? As of March 10, 2003 in order to discharge stormwater from a construction site, all construction projects that disturb 1 acre or more of land must seek coverage under a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general construction permit.

    Disturbance includes, but is not limited to soil disturbance, clearing, grading, and excavation. Large construction activities are defined as being five or more acres. Operators of sites disturbing less than one acre are also required to obtain a permit if their activity is part of a "larger common plan of development or sale" with a planned disturbance of one acre or greater.

  3. Do I need a storm water permit? How do I apply? As of March 10, 2003 in order to discharge storm water from a construction site, all construction projects that disturb 1 acre or more of land must have either:
    • an individual storm water permit, or
    • coverage under California’s statewide General Permit for Construction Activity, or
    • Coverage under one of two regional permits, depending upon the location of the construction activity.
    As of June 18, 2003 Small Linear Projects can be covered under a separate General Permit for Linear Projects.

    Disturbance includes, but is not limited to soil disturbance, clearing, grading, and excavation. Operators of sites disturbing less than one acre are also required to obtain a permit if their activity is part of a “larger common plan of development or sale” with a planned disturbance of one acre or greater.

    To apply for coverage under one of the statewide General Permits you must file a Notice of Intent (NOI) with the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) of the California Environmental Protection Agency, prior to commencement of your construction activities. Individual permits are not normally issued (see Additional Information section).

    In addition to these statewide rules, you may be required to meet additional local storm water and erosion control regulations. Check with your city or county government to determine if additional local rules apply to your construction project. Select statefullname, primaryagencyname, primaryagencyurl From srt Where State = '#st#'

  4. Do I need a stormwater permit? How do I apply?
    As of March 10, 2003 in order to discharge stormwater from a construction site, all construction projects that disturb 1 acre or more of land must have either:
    • an individual stormwater permit, or
    • coverage under one of #geta.statefullname#’s general permits.
    Disturbance includes, but is not limited to soil disturbance, clearing, grading, and excavation. Operators of sites disturbing less than one acre are also required to obtain a permit if their activity is part of a “larger common plan of development or sale” with a planned disturbance of one acre or greater.

    To apply for an individual permit or for coverage under a statewide general permit you must file an application with the #geta.primaryagencyname# prior to commencement of your construction activities.

    In addition to these statewide rules, you may be required to meet additional local stormwater and erosion control regulations. Check with your city or county government to determine if additional local rules apply to your construction project.

    Select DistinctRow * From SwRl Where State = '#st#' and Cat='permit'

  5. Where can I find permit application forms and instructions?

    Select DistinctRow * From SwRl Where State = '#st#' and Cat='general'

  6. General Permits

    Select DistinctRow * From SwRl Where State = '#st#' and Cat='contact'

  7. Whom should I contact for more information?
    SWRL hint: #hct#

    Select DistinctRow * From tmdl Where St = '#st#'

  8. Erosion & Sediment Control homepage for #getstate.statefull#
  9. No Erosion & Sediment Control homepage was found for #getstate.statefull#.

    Select DistinctRow * From SwRl Where State = '#st#' and ( Cat='other' or Cat='add' ) Order by ID desc

  10. Where can I find additional stormwater compliance resources?

    Select DistinctRow * From SwRl Where State = '#st#' and Cat='SI'


    Additional Information
    #getsi.si#



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